Bulk Edible Oil Blog

The How-To Pricing Of Bulk Oil Compares to Sunflower/Safflower Oil

Posted by Alexa Ketterling

High quality, non-GMO and organic oils are in such high demand. If you use specialty oils or natural oils as a bulk ingredient in your manufacturing facility you are probably already well aware.

These premium oils often come at a higher price. Perhaps you are already feeling the pressure from the market, and looking at other alternatives that could help you save on costs and increase your profitability.

Today, let’s focus on the giant elephant in the room…. the price. Here is how some of the most commonly known healthy non-GMO and organic oils compare.

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Is All Expeller Pressed Oils Also Non-GMO?

Posted by Alexa Ketterling

Expeller Pressed vs. Non-GMO: these two traits are interrelated and a common point of discussion. Is expeller pressed oil automatically non-GMO? Is all non-GMO automatically expeller pressed? To help with a bit of the confusion we will break down some helpful information to find out truly whether or not it your oil is just expeller pressed or non-GMO — and what the difference really is.

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Organic Olive Oil vs. Other Olive Oil Grades

Posted by Alexa Ketterling

How is organic extra virgin olive oil different than each of the other grades of olive oil? Today we will explain the difference between organic and regular extra virgin olive oil, as well as the difference between organic extra virgin and some of the other olive oil grades like Pure, Refined and Pomace.

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7 Basics You Should Know About Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Posted by Hannah Broaddus

We talk a lot about the different grades of olive oil: how they’re made, what they’re used for. But, it’s been a while since we talked about Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil in particular. Sometimes, organic EVOO seems so straight forward that it’s easy to glance over.

This week, I’d like to bring it back to this classic, premium (and my personal favorite) oil. Here’s some basics about Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil that you should know.

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Organic vs. Non-Organic Oils: Are They Really That Different?

Posted by Hannah Broaddus

Across the board, are ALL oils really that different when you compare the organic vs. the non-organic versions of them? Is organic extra virgin olive oil that different from regular extra virgin olive oil, or organic canola oil that different than regular canola oil?

The answer really depends on the oil, and requires that we dive a little deeper.

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Is There Really A Low Fat Olive Oil?

Posted by Alexa Ketterling

Is there such a thing as “light” olive oil? To answer this question, you have to start with defining which type of “light” you are referring to.

Olive oil described as “light” does not mean that it is a low fat oil. What makes it a “light” oil is actually the particular grade of oil: “Extra Light Olive Oil”, “Light-Tasting Olive Oil”, “Extra Lite Tasting Olive Oil”. All of those terms refer to the type of oil inside, not that it is low fat.

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Olive Oil vs Canola Oil

Posted by Hannah Broaddus

What's the difference between olive oil and canola oil? Put side by side, these two oils are actually quite disparate.

When you consider these oils from a home-use perspective, any differences might seem minor or unimportant. In this small-scale situation, the primary thing on the line is your health and you'll choose the oil that best fits your needs and your beliefs.

When you look at these oils from the perspective of an industrial food manufacturer, however, there's a lot more riding on this "simple decision". Understanding the objective differences will help you make the right educated choice -- whether it's for your family or for your company. 

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Comparing Types of Fat: Monounsaturated Polyunsaturated Saturated & Trans

Posted by Hannah Broaddus

Did you know that your oil is made up of a few different types of fats — some of which are regarded as healthy and some of which are not?

There are 3 natural types of fat: Saturated Fat, Monounsaturated Fat and Polyunsaturated Fat.

Saturated fat is listed on the nutritional label of your products as a subcategory.  Though they’re not often mentioned, there are 2 more subtypes that could be listed in the same area: the monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.

These last two are what is considered “good fat”. On the flip side, saturated fat is generally considered to be the “bad fat”.  However, with the popularity of coconut oil, this has come under hot debate recently.

Trans fat seems to be in it’s own category, a widely known bad type of fat that is artificially created through partial-hydrogenation.

By looking at the different types of fat and the ratios of each within an oil, you can determine which ones are healthier and which ones you should limit.

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Olive Oil Blends: Why Multiple Oils Are Ideal For Food Manufacturers

Posted by Hannah Broaddus

More and more, I’m recommending that my customers use an oil blend when they can — when their customers will appreciate it rather than feeling like it detracts from their product.

Why do I like these blends so much? I think an oil blend has a number of advantages that they bring to the table. But it all depends on what you’re looking for.

To be clear, a blend is a mix of two different types of oils. Both of them would have to be listed on your ingredient label, so you'd have two different oils in your product instead of one.

If you’ve been considering this option, today I’d like to help you see the oil blend option in a new light. 

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The Difference Between Solvent Expelled, Expeller Pressed and Cold Pressed Oil

Posted by Hannah Broaddus

It’s hard to know exactly what you’re getting when it comes to oil. Oils are produced in lots of different ways — some are expelled using solvents like hexane, some are expeller pressed with a mechanical press that physically squeezes the oil out.

How an oil is produced isn’t always “clearly marked” either. Sometimes the descriptors are in the title, sometimes they’re in abbreviated form (so you’ve got to know the lingo), and sometimes they’re only in the description on the spec sheet. We’ve even found that some vendors are not so adept at quality control, so sometimes you will find no mention of how the oil is made on any documents — and it will be in your hands to make sure you ask the right questions and get the proper documentation.

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